recent news//


Clinton Fein: Please Lie to Me
Art Mur 15th Anniversary Exhibition
Montreal gallery, Art Mur is located at 5826 rue St-Hubert. "Please Lie to Me," features Clinton Fein along with a group of talented artists, including the highly controversial Chinese artist duo, the Gao Brothers
Saturday November 5, 2011 - December 17, 2011

Berkeley Says "No" to Torture
Defying Torture - The Art of Dissent
A conversation with historian/critic/activist Peter Selz and artists Clinton Fein and Richard Kamler. Location: UC Berkeley Art Museum Theater, 2621 Durant Avenue, Berkeley
Wednesday Oct 13, 2010 at 4:30 pm

Clinton Fein: Recap
Toomey Tourell Projects, San Francisco
June 4- August 7, 2010

Rules of Engagement
Marcia E. Vetrocq, Art in America
June/July, 2008

A Call to Arms
Maureen Davidson, Metro Santa Cruz Weekly
October 8, 2008

Buy into It
Michael Leaverton, SF Weekly
May 20, 2008

Kamler also asked South Africa's infamous Clinton Fein to contribute. You remember him: last year, his wall-sized photographs re-creating Abu Ghraib torture scenes reverberated like mortar bombs throughout the 49 Geary art complex. Imagine what he could do with a white dove.

Billboards bring peace message to city streets
Heather Tirado Gilligan, Bay Area Reporter
May 29, 2008

San Francisco billboard display peace messages (video)
Heather Ishimaru, ABC News
May 27, 2008

Wheatpaste for peace: SF Peace Billboards Project launches
Ariel Soto, San Francisco Bay Guardian
May 26, 2008

Night + Day: Calendar Picks
Janine Kahn, SF Weekly
May 26, 2008


Bridge: Chicago fair launches first London edition
The Art Newspaper, London
October 12, 2007

Fein Downfall, China
September 2007

Iraq inspires surge of protest art
By Peter Beaumont, The Observer
September 9, 2007



Clinton Fein's blog on SFGATE, the San Francisco Chronicle's new experiment with community blogging. An irreverent look at what's happening in the world of pop culture. Check it out...

Listen to Clinton Fein talking to Richard Kamler on his radio show, Art Talk

'NY Times' and the WCHA Dinner
By Clinton Fein, Letters, Editor & Publisher
May 1, 2007

The Horror of Torture, Reinterpreted through Art
By Kenneth Baker, The San Francisco Chronicle
January 20, 2007

Precision Strike
By Michael Leaverton, SF Weekly
January 17, 2007

The Bigger Picture: 'Torture': Photographer restages infamous images from Abu Ghraib
By Reyhan Harmanci, The San Francisco Chronicle
January 11, 2007

Looking at Torture
By Andrew Sullivan, Time Magazine
January 2, 2007


"Who says what's officially annoying? Is that a business we really want our government to be in?" -- Clinton Fein, purveyor of the website, complaining about a bill in Congress that would make it a federal crime to "annoy" someone over the Internet.

Time Magazine, February 26, 2006

Cyberstalking law opens debate on what's annoying

"It's a stupid law that has slipped in under the radar," says Clinton Fein, a San Francisco-based artist who runs, a website that he says offers "unique and irreverent" commentary on politics and culture.

Richard Willing, USA Today, February 14, 2006

New cyberstalker law raises criticism

Clinton Fein, who runs the Web site, is also aghast. His site is specifically set up to annoy people through, among other means, anonymous postcards sent through the mail that direct the recipient to read the sender's message at the site. Fein calls the new legislation annoying.

Reid Goldsborough, Philadelphia Inquirer, January 29, 2006

Is it illegal, or just annoying?

The nation's new cyberstalking restrictions started this month. The legislation updates laws designed to protect people from harrassment. The updated law makes it illegal to use the Internet to harrass someone. But a provision of the legislation also adds the word "annoy" to the types of communication that's illegal.

Listen in RealAudio

One of the people who picked up on this new language is the creator of the Web site Clinton Fein calls himself a political artist. He's based in San Francisco. He photoshops irreverant and frequently offensive digital postcards for users to send anonymously to whomever they want--the attorney general of the United States, for example, or perhaps your boss. Fein readily admits to pushing legal boundaries. But he wonders who, under the new law, decides what is legally annoying.

Art Hughes Interview, Future Tense, January 20, 2006

Does New Cyberstalking Law Criminalize Free Expression?

First, we will discover what Section 113 truly means when someone challenges the law. A candidate being mentioned on the Internet is; the site offers a "service by which people send politically incorrect postcards without being required to furnish their identity."

The site owner Clinton Fein has a history of "seeking declaratory and injunctive relief" against the Communications Decency Act of 1996 through which "indecent" computer communication that is intended to "annoy" was criminalized. Fein believes Section 113 "warrant[s] a constitutional challenge."

Wendy McElroy, Fox News, January 17, 2006


Annoying someone via the Internet is now a federal crime. It's no joke. Last Thursday, President Bush signed into law a prohibition on posting annoying Web messages or sending annoying e-mail messages without disclosing your true identity.

Clinton Fein, a San Francisco resident who runs the site, says a feature permitting visitors to send obnoxious and profane postcards through e-mail could be imperiled.

"Who decides what's annoying? That's the ultimate question," Fein said. He added: "If you send an annoying message via the United States Post Office, do you have to reveal your identity?"

Declan McCullagh, C|Net, January 9, 2006


Clinton Fein responds to new legislation making it a crime to send anonymous email with an "intent to annoy."

Read more

US criminalises cyber-harassment

Civil liberties groups have vowed to fight the legislation in the courts under the First Amendment, claiming that it would make it impossible for whistleblowers to operate without putting themselves at risk.

Clinton Fein, a South African activist who runs, was scathing about the new law.

"It appears that one is guilty of a crime if one were simply to 'utilise' a telecoms device 'with intent to annoy' a person regardless of the content or even in its absence," he said. "A conduct rather than a content crime; perhaps waving a BlackBerry in someone's face."

Iain Thomson,, January 10, 2006

ARTIST. This South African provocateur's vitriolic, darkly comic digital montages attack President Bush, his cabinet and his Iraq policies. The New York Times.


Clinton Fein (born 1964) is a South African born artist, writer and activist, closely identified with his controversial web site, and his notable Supreme Court victory against Janet Reno, Attorney General of the United States, challenging the constitutionality of the Communications Decency Act in 1997, where Fein's right to disseminate his art (such as the uenequivocally indecent and annoying Torture exhibition) was upheld in a landmark victory for the First Amendment.

Clinton Fein Biography

Reviews, Articles & Media Coverage

Latest News & Updates

Clinton Fein Editorials & Writing

Previous and Upcoming Gallery Exhibitions

Clinton Fein Author Page on Red Room

Clinton Fein on SF Gate

Clinton Fein Channel on YouTube

Clinton Fein on Twitter

Clinton Fein on Facebook

First Amendment Project Blog

Pointing Fingers on SFGate.comART, POLITICS AND CENSORSHIP

As an artist, Fein is represented by Toomey Tourell Gallery in San Francisco and Axis Gallery in New York, and his shows have been dogged by controversy. In 2001, Fein was scheduled to open a solo exhibition in San Francisco in October. After the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, Artforum Magazine pulled an advertisment for Fein's show from their October issue. In 2004, printing company Zazzle found themselves embroiled in an ugly censorship dispute after they deliberately destroyed two of Fein's images.


ApolloMedia vs. The United States Navy (The Conduct Unbecoming Censorship Dispute).

ApolloMedia vs. Reno (The Supreme Court challenge).

The United States vs. ApolloMedia (The Federal suit defense).